Ode to positive constructive daydreaming

Neurons

A recent issue of the journal, Frontiers in Psychology, features a review article, “Ode to positive constructive daydreaming.”

According to the article’s abstract:

Nearly 60 years ago, Jerome L. Singer launched a groundbreaking research program into daydreaming (Singer, 1955, 1975, 2009) that presaged and laid the foundation for virtually every major strand of mind wandering research active today (Antrobus, 1999; Klinger, 1999, 2009). Here we review Singer’s enormous contribution to the field, which includes insights, methodologies, and tools still in use today, and trace his enduring legacy as revealed in the recent proliferation of mind wandering studies. We then turn to the central theme in Singer’s work, the adaptive nature of positive constructive daydreaming, which was a revolutionary idea when Singer began his work in the 1950s and remains underreported today. Last, we propose a new approach to answering the enduring question: Why does mind wandering persist and occupy so much of our time, as much as 50% of our waking time according to some estimates, if it is as costly as most studies suggest?

___________________________________________________

KC Education Research Updates is a sister site of the KC Education Enterprise, which covers policy news of interest to residents of 28 districts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

Advertisements
Posted in News | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

White matter microstructure correlates of mathematical giftedness and intelligence quotient

Neurons

White matter microstructure correlates of mathematical giftedness and intelligence quotient” is the title of an article reporting new research appearing in this month’s issue of the scientific journal, Human Brain Mapping.

According to the article’s abstract:

Recent functional neuroimaging studies have shown differences in brain activation between mathematically gifted adolescents and controls. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between mathematical giftedness, intelligent quotient (IQ), and the microstructure of white matter tracts in a sample composed of math-gifted adolescents and aged-matched controls. … In a whole-sample analysis, IQ showed a significant positive correlation with FA [fractional anisotropy], mainly in the corpus callosum, supporting the idea that efficient information transfer between hemispheres is crucial for higher intellectual capabilities. In addition, math-gifted adolescents showed increased FA (adjusted for IQ) in white matter tracts connecting frontal lobes with basal ganglia and parietal regions. The enhanced anatomical connectivity observed in the forceps minor and splenium may underlie the greater fluid reasoning, visuospatial working memory, and creative capabilities of these children.

___________________________________________________

KC Education Research Updates is a sister site of the KC Education Enterprise, which covers policy news of interest to residents of 28 districts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

Posted in News | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Inner-ear disorders may cause hyperactivity

Neurons

Inner-ear disorders may cause hyperactivity” is the title of an article appearing earlier this month in the online Medical Xpress. The article summarizes new research appearing in the online edition of Science.

According to the Medical Xpress article:

Behavioral abnormalities are traditionally thought to originate in the brain. But a new study by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University has found that inner-ear dysfunction can directly cause neurological changes that increase hyperactivity.

___________________________________________________
KC Education Research Updates is a sister site of the 
KC Education Enterprise, which covers policy news of interest to residents of 28 districts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

Posted in News | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Dishonest deeds lead to ‘cheater’s high,’ as long as no one gets hurt, study finds

Neurons

Dishonest deeds lead to ‘cheater’s high,’ as long as no one gets hurt, study finds” is the title of an article appearing earlier this month in the online Medical Xpress. The article discusses implications of new research appearing in the American Psychological Association’s Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

According to the Medical Xpress article:

Even when there was no tangible reward, people who cheated felt better on average than those who didn’t cheat, according to results of several experiments that involved more than 1,000 people in the U.S. and England.

___________________________________________________
KC Education Research Updates is a sister site of the 
KC Education Enterprise, which covers policy news of interest to residents of 28 districts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

Posted in News | Tagged | Leave a comment

Youth more likely to be bullied at schools with anti-bullying programs

Neurons

Youth more likely to be bullied at schools with anti-bullying programs, UTA researcher finds,” is the title of an article appearing earlier this month in the online Science Codex. This article discusses implications of new research published in the Journal of Criminology.

According to the Science Codex article:

Anti-bullying initiatives have become standard at schools across the country, but a new UT Arlington study finds that students attending those schools may be more likely to be a victim of bullying than children at schools without such programs. …

‘One possible reason for this is that the students who are victimizing their peers have learned the language from these anti-bullying campaigns and programs,’ said Seokjin Jeong, an assistant professor of criminology and criminal justice at UT Arlington and lead author of the study … .

___________________________________________________
KC Education Research Updates is a sister site of the 
KC Education Enterprise, which covers policy news of interest to residents of 28 districts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

Posted in News | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Aerobic Fitness and the Attentional Blink in Preadolescent Children

Neurons

Aerobic Fitness and the Attentional Blink in Preadolescent Children” is the topic of a report of new research appearing this month in the journal Neuropsychology.

According to the report:

Given the growing concern that children in today’s industrialized and technologically advanced society are becoming more sedentary and less fit, a greater understanding of the extent to which aerobic fitness relates to brain health and cognition during development is of increasing importance. … Results indicated that higher fit children exhibited greater task performance and better attentional resources distribution … .

___________________________________________________
KC Education Research Updates is a sister site of the 
KC Education Enterprise, which covers policy news of interest to residents of 28 districts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

Posted in News | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

New Teaching Method Improves Math Skills, Closes Gender Gap in Young Students

Neurons

An article appearing this week in ScienceDaily summarizes implications of new work by Florida State University researchers.

According to the article, “New Teaching Method Improves Math Skills, Closes Gender Gap in Young Students“:

When early elementary math teachers ask students to explain their problem-solving strategies and then tailor instruction to address specific gaps in their understanding, students learn significantly more than those taught using a more traditional approach.

___________________________________________________
KC Education Research Updates is a sister site of the 
KC Education Enterprise, which covers policy news of interest to residents of 28 districts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

Posted in News | Tagged , | Leave a comment