Dishonest deeds lead to ‘cheater’s high,’ as long as no one gets hurt, study finds

Neurons

Dishonest deeds lead to ‘cheater’s high,’ as long as no one gets hurt, study finds” is the title of an article appearing earlier this month in the online Medical Xpress. The article discusses implications of new research appearing in the American Psychological Association’s Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.

According to the Medical Xpress article:

Even when there was no tangible reward, people who cheated felt better on average than those who didn’t cheat, according to results of several experiments that involved more than 1,000 people in the U.S. and England.

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KC Education Research Updates is a sister site of the 
KC Education Enterprise, which covers policy news of interest to residents of 28 districts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

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Youth more likely to be bullied at schools with anti-bullying programs

Neurons

Youth more likely to be bullied at schools with anti-bullying programs, UTA researcher finds,” is the title of an article appearing earlier this month in the online Science Codex. This article discusses implications of new research published in the Journal of Criminology.

According to the Science Codex article:

Anti-bullying initiatives have become standard at schools across the country, but a new UT Arlington study finds that students attending those schools may be more likely to be a victim of bullying than children at schools without such programs. …

‘One possible reason for this is that the students who are victimizing their peers have learned the language from these anti-bullying campaigns and programs,’ said Seokjin Jeong, an assistant professor of criminology and criminal justice at UT Arlington and lead author of the study … .

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KC Education Research Updates is a sister site of the 
KC Education Enterprise, which covers policy news of interest to residents of 28 districts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

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Aerobic Fitness and the Attentional Blink in Preadolescent Children

Neurons

Aerobic Fitness and the Attentional Blink in Preadolescent Children” is the topic of a report of new research appearing this month in the journal Neuropsychology.

According to the report:

Given the growing concern that children in today’s industrialized and technologically advanced society are becoming more sedentary and less fit, a greater understanding of the extent to which aerobic fitness relates to brain health and cognition during development is of increasing importance. … Results indicated that higher fit children exhibited greater task performance and better attentional resources distribution … .

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KC Education Research Updates is a sister site of the 
KC Education Enterprise, which covers policy news of interest to residents of 28 districts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

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New Teaching Method Improves Math Skills, Closes Gender Gap in Young Students

Neurons

An article appearing this week in ScienceDaily summarizes implications of new work by Florida State University researchers.

According to the article, “New Teaching Method Improves Math Skills, Closes Gender Gap in Young Students“:

When early elementary math teachers ask students to explain their problem-solving strategies and then tailor instruction to address specific gaps in their understanding, students learn significantly more than those taught using a more traditional approach.

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KC Education Research Updates is a sister site of the 
KC Education Enterprise, which covers policy news of interest to residents of 28 districts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

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Non-Traditional Mathematics Curriculum Results in Higher Standardized Test Scores

Neurons

A recent ScienceDaily article discusses implications of new research appearing in the Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, “Non-Traditional Mathematics Curriculum Results in Higher Standardized Test Scores.”

According to the article:

James Tarr, a professor in the MU College of Education, and Doug Grouws, a professor emeritus from MU, studied more than 3,000 high school students around the country to determine whether there is a difference in achievement when students study from an integrated mathematics program or a more traditional curriculum. Integrated mathematics is a curriculum that combines several mathematic topics, such as algebra, geometry and statistics, into single courses. Many countries that currently perform higher than the U.S. in mathematics achievement use a more integrated curriculum.

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KC Education Research Updates is a sister site of the 
KC Education Enterprise, which covers policy news of interest to residents of 28 districts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

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Researcher finds that poverty’s ‘cognitive cost’ translates to as many as ten IQ points

Neurons

A recent article on the Phys.org website summarizes new work by Harvard researchers investigating the effects of poverty on intelligence quotient measurements.

According to the article:

The accumulation of those money woes and day-to-day worries leaves many low-income individuals not only struggling financially, but cognitively … . In a study published August 29 in Science, he showed that the “cognitive deficit” caused by poverty translates into as many as 10 IQ points.

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KC Education Research Updates is a sister site of the 
KC Education Enterprise, which covers policy news of interest to residents of 28 districts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

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Poor Grades Motivate Students to Act Out, Not Try Harder

Neurons

Progressive education expert Alfie Kohn today Tweeted “New 5-yr study: far from motivating kids to try harder, a bad grade is likely to lead to acting out,” providing a link to new research appearing in a recent issue of Journal of Education Psychology.

According to the abstract for the article,  “Reciprocal effects between adolescent externalizing problems and measures of achievement“:

Student misbehavior is a pervasive problem and may seriously affect academic achievement. Previous research hints at different effects depending on whether achievement tests or achievement judgments are used as academic outcomes. Previous research also indicates that low achievement can conversely contribute to problem behavior and that low self-esteem—maybe as a consequence of low achievement—is a further source of problem behavior during adolescence. The purpose of this 3-wave longitudinal study was to investigate the complex interplay of externalizing problem behavior, self-esteem, and academic achievement as measured by teacher-given grades and standardized tests in reading comprehension and mathematics. Participants were N = 1,045 junior high school students followed from Grade 5 to Grade 9. Results of structural equation models were fairly consistent across both domains. The findings imply that externalizing problems are reflected in teacher-given grades more than in standardized achievement tests. Furthermore, worse grades were found to have unique detrimental effects on increased future externalizing problem behavior repeatedly over time and across domains. The reciprocal effects between externalizing problems and school grades tend to lead into a downward spiral. Self-esteem negatively affected externalizing problems in earlier grades and served as a partial mediator between school grades and subsequent externalizing problem behavior.

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KC Education Research Updates is a sister site of the KC Education Enterprise, which covers policy news of interest to residents of 28 districts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

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ABSTRACT Do Girls Really Experience More Anxiety in Mathematics?

Neurons

“Do Girls Really Experience More Anxiety in Mathematics” is the title of an article reporting new research in the most recent edition of the journal, Psychological Science.

According to the article’s abstract:

Two studies were conducted to examine gender differences in trait (habitual) versus state (momentary) mathematics anxiety in a sample of students (Study 1: N = 584; Study 2: N = 111). For trait math anxiety, the findings of both studies replicated previous research showing that female students report higher levels of anxiety than do male students. However, no gender differences were observed for state anxiety, as assessed using experience-sampling methods while students took a math test (Study 1) and attended math classes (Study 2). The discrepant findings for trait versus state math anxiety were partly accounted for by students’ beliefs about their competence in mathematics, with female students reporting lower perceived competence than male students despite having the same average grades in math. Implications for educational practices and the assessment of anxiety are discussed.

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KC Education Research Updates is a sister site of the KC Education Enterprise, which covers policy news of interest to residents of 28 districts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

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Not All Minds That Wander Are Lost

Neurons
Not all minds that wander are lost: the importance of a balanced perspective on the mind-wandering state” is the title of an article appearing this month in Frontiers in Psychology.

According to the article abstract:

The waking mind is often occupied with mental contents that are minimally constrained by events in the here and now. These self-generated thoughts—e.g., mind-wandering or daydreaming—interfere with external task performance and can be a marker for unhappiness and even psychiatric problems. They also occupy our thoughts for upwards of half of the time, and under non-demanding conditions they (i) allow us to connect our past and future selves together, (ii) help us make successful long-term plans and (iii) can provide a source of creative inspiration. The lengths that the mind goes to self-generate thought, coupled with its apparent functionality, suggest that the mind places a higher priority on such cognition than on many other mental acts. Although mind-wandering may be unpleasant for the individual who experiences it and disruptive to the tasks of the moment, self-generated thought allows consciousness freedom from the here and now and so reflects a key evolutionary adaptation for the mind.

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KC Education Research Updates is a sister site of the KC Education Enterprise, which covers policy news of interest to residents of 28 districts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

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Right Brain, Left Brain? Scientists Debunk Popular Theory

Neurons
Right Brain, Left Brain? Scientists Debunk Popular Theory” is the title of Huffington Post article published earlier today. It discusses some implications of new research — “An Evaluation of the Left-Brain vs. Right-Brain Hypothesis with Resting State Functional Connectivity Magnetic Resonance Imaging” –appearing in a recent issue of the journal, PLOS ONE.

According to the Huffington Post article:

It turns out, though, that this idea of “brained-ness” might be more of a figure of speech than anything, as researchers have found that these personality traits may not have anything to do with which side of the brain you use more.

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KC Education Research Updates is a sister site of the KC Education Enterprise, which covers policy news of interest to residents of 28 districts in the Kansas City metropolitan area.

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